Therefore I felt convinced, after full experience, that as regards very large classes of public servants by far the best way to choose the men for appointment was by means of written competitive examination.

M. Because, if to die were miserable to the dead, to live would be a kind of infinite and eternal misery. The request was [129]complied with in so literal a sense, that the now wretched Midas bitterly repented his folly and cupidity, for, when the pangs of hunger assailed him, and he essayed to appease …

Others there be, who though they stand not upon retaliation, to require any, yet they think with themselves nevertheless, that such a one is their debtor, and they know as their word is what they have done.

Hearing not so much the words as the angry tone of Rostopchín’s voice, the crowd moaned and heaved forward, but again paused. Then, too, Sherman knew that if Lee should escape me I would be on his heels, and he and Johnson together would be crushed in one blow if they attempted to make a …

I do not attack them; ‘tis their art I inveigh against, and do not much blame them for making their advantage of our folly, for most men do the same.

Now the Dictator for the time being performed all acts with the same authority as the most absolute sovereign; nor could any other power annul his acts. The events of the next fifteen years, vital as they are to constitutional history, must be briefly gone over. Unquestionably, Minister von Maybach rendered valuable services in the …

The following day the motion for a dissolution in the Commons was lost by a minority of one hundred and forty-two to one hundred and ninety-three.

At his request they repaired the fortress of Halk-al-vad, and garrisoned it with four thousand soldiers. Libenter homines id, quod volunt, credunt—Men are fain to believe what they wish. Forgive me, my dear sir, but if I had not known it I should not have addressed you. died. §§ 3, 4) to the effect that …

In like manner, if a man were to choose whether he would have his soldiers richly and sumptuously accoutred or armed only for the necessity of the matter in hand, this argument would step in to favour the first, of which opinion was Sertorius, Philopcemen, Brutus, Caesar, and others, that it is to a soldier an enflaming of courage and a spur himself in brave attire; and withal a motive to be more obstinate in fight, having his arms, which are in a manner his estate and whole inheritance to defend; which is the reason, says Xenophon, why those of Asia carried their wives and concubines, with their choicest jewels and greatest wealth, along with them to the wars.

You are tired. Ille per extentum funem mihi posse videtur / Ire poeta, meum qui pectus inaniter angit / Irritat mulcet falsis terroribus implet / Ut magus: et modo me Thebis, modo ponit Athenis—That man seems to me able to do anything (lit. walk on the tight-rope) who, as a poet, tenures my breast with …

And Tacitus, in reference to this, speaking of Cogidunus, king of England, gives us, by a marvellous touch, an instance of that infinite power: the Romans, says he, were from all antiquity accustomed to leave the kings they had subdued in possession of their kingdoms under their authority.

A prince of such a character, alike incapable of governing, either in peace or in war, might purchase the support, but he could never obtain the esteem, of the army. On the one view, this irony seems to be something untrue. The Quakers in particular sent up a grateful address, which was presented by Penn …